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Glossary of Information Governance Terms

NAMESPACE
  1. Context:
    Metadata


    Definition:
    A DCMI namespace is a collection of DCMI terms. Each DCMI namespace is identified by a URI. An XML namespace [XML-NAMES] is a collection of names, identified by a URI reference [RFC2396], that are used in XML documents as element types and attribute names. The use of XML namespaces to uniquely identify metadata terms allows those terms to be unambiguously used across applications, promoting the possibility of shared semantics. The use of namespaces allows the definition of an element to be unambiguously identified with a URI, even though the label "title" alone might occur in many metadata sets. In more general terms, one can think of any closed set of names as a namespace. Thus, a controlled vocabulary such as the Library of Congress Subject Headings, a set of metadata elements such as DC, or the set of all URLs in a given domain can be thought of as a namespace that is managed by the authority that is in charge of that particular set of terms.


    Example:
    The namespace for Dublin Core elements and qualifiers would be expressed respectively in XML as: xmlns:dc = "http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/ xmlns:dcterms = "http://purl.org/dc/terms/


    Source:
    Dublin Core Metadata Initiative


  2. Context:
    Metadata


    Definition:
    The set of unique names used to identify objects within a well-defined domain, particularly relevant for XML applications. An XML Namespace is a W3C recommendation for providing uniquely named elements and attributes in an XML instance. A namespace is declared using the reserved XML attribute xmlns, the value of which must be a URI (Uniform Resource Identifier) reference. For example, the Dublin Core Metadata Element Set, Version 1.1 (original 15 elements) has the approved DCMI namespace URI as http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/.


    Example:


    Source:
    Introduction to Metadata, 2nd Edition, Getty Research Institute